Monday, May 23, 2016

new crochet pattern - cabled keyhole scarf by kim miller.




Cabled Keyhole Scarf by Kim Miller

Skill Level: Intermediate

Cozy up in style with this richly textured, crochet cabled, keyhole scarf!

This detailed crochet pattern is complete with colour illustrations. The pattern calls for 1½ skeins of Cascade Yarns® 220 [100 g (3.5 oz)/200 meters (220 yds) per skein] in Silver Grey (8401), 1½ skeins of Cascade Yarns® 220 in Natural (8010), and a 5.00 mm (H) crochet hook.

This crochet pattern calls for the following stitches and techniques: slip stitch, double crochet, front post double crochet, back post double crochet and front post treble crochet.

The finished scarf measures 15.2 cm (6”) wide, and 142.2 cm (56”) long. Please note that measurements are approximate and will be affected by the gauge and the brand of yarn. 




Purchase this pattern from Ravelry and receive 20% off your purchase by using coupon code "KeyholeScarf20" at the checkout. Offer valid until Tuesday, May 31st, 2016 



kim.

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

sneak peek.

I know that it is a crazy time of year to be working on a cozy scarf pattern, but that's just where my brain is at the moment. Besides...crocheting and crafting doesn't always have to make sense...sometimes it just needs to make us smile :)




I'm hoping to have the crochet pattern for this "Cabled Keyhole Scarf" up soon!


kim.

Monday, April 25, 2016

does reading a crochet pattern intimidate you?

Does reading a crochet pattern intimidate you??? It may be a lot easier then you think! It's all about the abbreviations, so...




.... if you can read texting language then you can read a crochet pattern!

For additional tips and hints on how to read a crochet pattern check out our post "tips on how to read a crochet pattern".



kim.

Thursday, March 17, 2016

new crochet pattern - feathers and fans cowl by kim miller.

Feathers and Fans Cowl by Kim Miller

Feathers and Fans Cowl by Kim Miller


Skill Level: Intermediate

Light and airy, this knit look cowl is the perfect project to use up that one special ball of lace weight luxury yarn. 

This crochet pattern calls for 1 ball 1 ball of Knit Picks® Aloft Super Kid Mohair Yarn [25 g (0.88 oz)/400 meters (246 yds) per ball 72% Super Kid Mohair 25% Silk] or comparable yarn, a 4.00 mm (G) crochet hook and a 3.50 mm (E) crochet hook. The cowl is worked in one piece from the bottom up. The completed cowl measures 25.4 cm (10”) wide and 22.9 cm (9”) in length. Please note that the size is approximate and will be affected by the gauge and the brand of wool.

This crochet pattern calls for the following stitches and techniques: Slip stitch, single crochet, double crochet, front post double crochet and back post double crochet. Although the pattern calls for simple crochet stitches, I've marked it as intermediate because of the type of yarn required.






(Purchase this pattern from Ravelry and receive 20% off your purchase by using coupon code "FeathersAndFans20" at the checkout. Offer valid until Thrusday, March 31st, 2016) 



kim.

Thursday, March 10, 2016

sneak peek.

This feather light cowl is the perfect accessory to carry you through till spring!


I'm hoping to have the crochet pattern up next week.


kim.

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

national crochet month 2016.



Did you know that March is National Crochet Month? 

Wondering how you can celebrate? Here's a few ideas for you...

                            ● Teach someone how to crochet.
                            ● Crochet something for a charity, friend, or family member.
                            ● Join the Crocheters Guild of America.
                            ● Work on a crochet project every day!

Tara and I would love to hear the creative ways that you are making crocheting a part of your life this month, so please feel free to share in the comments section below.

Have a wonderful month and happy crocheting!!!



kim and tara.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

how to correctly place your post stitches

I love the looks of front and back post stitches to create beautiful cables and designs on an otherwise flat fabric. But I must admit, I sometimes have difficulty figuring out where my next stitch should be placed, whether I am transitioning to a post stitch or back to a "regular" stitch. This often leads to me having to rip out the row and start over, really concentrating on my stitch placement. 

There are a few tricks that I use for myself that I thought might be useful for everyone else as well. Below is the beginning stages of a pattern that I have in the works.

Instructions for Row 2: Ch 2 (counts as a hdc), hdc in next hdc and each of the next 4 hdc, four-post cable over the next four stitches, hdc in next hdc and each of the next 7 hdc, four-post cable over the next four stitches, hdc in next hdc and each of the next 4 hdc, hdc in the turning ch, turn

I am about to do my four post cable where I must skip the next two posts and make a front post double crochet (fpdc) around each of the third and fourth post

   
It's not always so easy to tell if you are only looking at your current row, as it is hard to see which post your current stitch is actually sitting above. I have goofed up on this many, many times. So now I look at my previous row and count the posts. I just made 6 half double crochet (hdc) so I want to count in 6 posts and then my next two posts will be the ones I skip.


The two posts highlighted in a darker purple are the two posts that I am going to skip and I will place a fpdc around each of the next two posts as you can see in the next picture.


Now I must finish the four post cable by placing a fpdc around the two previously missed posts. After finishing my cable stitches, I return to making half double crochets, but this can also get confusing.


This is when I flip over my work and look at the back side. The post stitches push the tops of the stitches towards the back of the work and they are easy to locate. 

 

The stitches highlighted in soft blue are the tops of the stitches that have been pushed towards the back of the work. The cable was made up of four post stitches so count the four stitches and the next stitch (highlighted in purple) is where you will place your next hdc. 

 
Here it is on the front side again after doing a few half double crochet after the four post cable stitches.


Now you are off and running. Use these little tricks throughout your pattern and you will have no problem with your cables running amok. I know it has worked wonders for me and I hope that you find it useful as well. 

tara.